Drought Plants Tolerant

Sent on Friday April 1, 2011

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  • Plant of The Week!

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  • Sedum 'Maestro'

  • Sedum Maestro

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  • Common Name: “Sedum or Stonecrop”

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  • Proven Winners Image

  • We are happy to announce Sedum 'Maestro' is one of the first plants to be chosen for the Proven Winners®

  • I can tell you from first hand experience that 'Maestro' is one of Garden Crossings favorite Sedums. In late summer, the attractive, sturdy blue-green foliage is topped with rosy-pink flower clusters that are made up of hundreds of tiny flowers. 'Maestro' PP20,094 retains its tidy, mounded shape every year and does not open up in the center like other Sedums do over time.

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  • Stonecrop Maestro

  • Color
    Deep Pink
    USDA Hardiness Zone
    3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
     
    Height
    24-30 Inches
    Spread
    24 Inches
    Homeowner Growing & Maintenance Tips:

    Sedum prefer full sun with dry to moderate soil. Sedum are great as borders, in mass or in containers. Sedums provide great fall color and are rabbit resistant!

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  • 5.5" Pot - $15.95  Sale $9.95

  •   1.89 qt/1.78L

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  • Perfect Drought Resistant Companions

  • Yarrow Strawberry Seduction

  • Achillea
    Strawberry Seduction
    PP18,401

    Yarrow

    5.5" Pot
    Price: $14.95
  • Echinacea
    Summer Sun
    PPAF

    Coneflower

    5.5" Pot
    Price: $17.95
  • False Indigo Twilight Prairie BluesBaptisia

  • Twilight Prairie Blues
    PP19,011

    False Indigo

    5.5" Pot
    Price: $17.95
  • Euphorbia

  • Bonfire
    PP18,585

    Spurge

    5.5" Pot
    Price: $16.95
  • Tickseed Big Bang™ 'Cosmic Eye

  • Coreopsis
    Big Bang™ 'Cosmic Eye
    PPAF

    Tickseed

    5.5" Pot
    Price: $15.95
  • Lupinus
    Gallery Red
     

    Lupine

    5.5" Pot
    Price: $14.95
  • Caring for Your Sedum

  • Improving Your Success with Sedum

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  • Sedum is one of the most popular perennials grown in American gardens because it is very easy to grow and hardy in most areas of the country. Because of its thick, succulent leaves which can store water, sedum is drought tolerant. It should be sited in average to poor soil that is well-drained. Plants grown in rich soil tend to be lanky and open. Most varieties should be grown in full sun to light shade. The lower growing types, however, will survive in partial shade. Divide sedum every 3-4 years to maintain its compact growth habit. Older plants tend to split in the center if they have not been divided. Pinching the taller varieties back by half in early summer will also help prevent them from splitting. This plant is not usually bothered by pests or diseases. The seed heads of the taller varieties provide excellent winter interest and food for birds. Remove them in spring when the new growth begins to show.

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