Ajuga 'Dixie Chip' Ajuga 'Dixie Chip'

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  • Photo Property of Garden Crossings LLC
  • Photo Courtesy of Walters Gardens, Inc.
  • Photo Property of Garden Crossings LLC
  • Photo Property of Garden Crossings LLC

Ajuga 'Dixie Chip'

Quick Overview

  • Tight Habit,
  • Quick to Mature,
  • Erosion Control,
Common Name:Bugleweed
Plant Type:Perennial
Hardiness Zone:3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Height:2 - 4 Inches
Spread:8 - 10 Inches
Exposure:Full Shade (0-4 hrs.)
Full Sun (+6 hrs.)
Part Shade (4-6 hrs.)
Nature Attractions:Butterflies, Hummingbirds
Critter Resistance:Deer
Flower Color:Blue Shades

Availability: Out of stock

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Description

Details

(Bugleweed) Ajuga Dixie Chip PPAF with its green, cream, and rose-purple variegated foliage in a mass planting will create a spectacular display for your garden. In mid to late spring, violet blue flowers appear above the low spreading foliage. Dixie Chip PPAF is a petite variegated ajuga, which was introduced by ItSaul Plants. It forms a tight habit making it useful for erosion control on slopes and also as a weed suppressing groundcover for the landscape.
More Info

Ajuga 'Dixie Chip'

Common Name Bugleweed
USDA Hardiness Zone 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Plant Type Perennial
Sun Exposure Full Shade (0-4 hrs.), Full Sun (+6 hrs.), Part Shade (4-6 hrs.)
Soil Moisture Needs Moderate
Nature Attractions Butterflies, Hummingbirds
Critter Resistance Deer
Flower Color Blue Shades
Attributes Evergreen
Design Use Border, Container, Ground Cover
Season of Interest (Flowering) Late Spring or Early Summer
Season of Interest (Foliage) Fall, Spring, Summer, Winter
Reviews

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Quality

Customer Reviews

Slug Resistance Review by Connie M | Zone: 6b
Quality
I chose these plants because the garden slugs were devouring everything in my shaded flowerbed. I love the rounded shape and the colors in the foliage and the garden slugs have left these plants alone! After planting them, we moved. So I dug them up and moved them, in July. Even though it was the hottest week of the summer and not the best time to transplant, they never skipped a beat. I am very happy with their hardiness, appearance and slug resistance. (Posted on 8/14/2013)
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